Dalai Lama at Jaipur Literature Festival 2013


The first day of DSC Jaipur Literature Festival 2013 saw a global icon of peace convey his message to thousands of festival attendees. The Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, spoke about his understanding of the way of seeing and knowing taught by the Buddha in conversation with author Pico Iyer. This marks the beginning of a special strand of sessions, titled ‘The Buddha in Literature’, at the Festival this year. 
Dalai Lama at Jaipur Literature Festival 2013 in conversation with author Pico Iyer
 
The Dalai Lama talked about global politics, although he conceded that he is now retired from his political role. He urged for there to be “good relations” between China and India, as they were the “most populous nations in the world”, and that China could learn from India. He said that these two countries needed to develop trust in each other and from that, equality and democracy could flourish without fear. 


The Dalai Lama talked about the challenges of the 21st century, with population increases, and the widening gap between the rich and the poor. He warned about greed, joking that “even if the whole world own, then maybe want to buy some land on moon and set up a hotel there”. He warned that corruption had become “the cancer of the whole world - very serious”, and called for a more sustainable economy, more protection for women, and to “forcibly reduce this gap between the rich and the poor”. He called the 20th century “a century of bloodshed, of violence” and urged that the “21st century be a century of dialogue”. 


This depends on education, he emphasised. He called for an update of the existing education system, saying “there is something lacking about it”, and that moral ethics should be taught from a secular base, since ethics are not dependent on religion. He emphasized the need to train the mind so that inner values and qualities could flourish, as “the mind knows no limitations” and we need to learn to use our intelligence “more holistically”.

Jaipur Literature Festival 2013 - Keynote Address

DSC Jaipur Literature Festival 2013 begins with Mahasweta Devi’s keynote speech – ‘O to Live Again’ ~ Ashok Gehlot – CM of Rajasthan and Margaret Alva – Governor of Rajasthan graced the inauguration with their valuable presence~ The 2013 edition of the DSC Jaipur Literature Festival started with an inauguration speech by eminent author and social activist Mahasweta Devi. She reflected on her long and illustrious life and writing career in a speech laced with references to the rich world of ideas she has imbibed from the tribal and rural cultures that have been the subject of her work. Ashok Gehlot - CM Rajasthan and Margaret Alva - Governor of Rajasthan at the inaugural ceremony of Jaipur Literature Festival 2013

Ashok Gehlot, CM Rajasthan and Margaret Alva, Governor of Rajasthan at the inaugural ceremony of Jaipur Literature Festival 2013
Having written on the “culture of the downtrodden” throughout her life, Mahasweta Devi referred to the simple dreams of simple people in her speech. She called for the “right to dream” to be the first fundamental right of all human beings.
Mahasweta Devi at Jaipur Literature Festival 2013
In a speech poignantly titled ‘O to Live Again’ renowned author Mahasweta Devi said “My early years proved to be formative for my future work as a writer and activist. I also have different approach to my writing process and I mull over the subjects in depth before setting out on the creative journey.”
Ashok Gehlot, CM Rajasthan and Margaret Alva, Governor of Rajasthan at the inaugural ceremony of Jaipur Literature Festival 2013
Commenting on this, Namita Gokhale, Festival Director – DSC Jaipur Literature Festival said “We are delighted to begin the event with Mahasweta Devi’s warm keynote which was not only inspiring but thought provoking. She has been constantly working for Human Rights and Women rights to bring a change in the society."

Shortlist - Man Booker International Prize 2013


Here we have the shortlist of the coveted Man Booker International Prize 2013 that was announced at the Jaipur Literature Festival 2013, which is happening from 24-28 January at Diggi Palace, Jaipur. The finalists for the fifth Man Booker International Prize 2013 were announced on the first day of the DSC Jaipur Literature Festival. 

Ten finalists have been chosen by a team of five judges for the £60,000 award. The judging panel consists of scholar and literary critic, Sir Christopher Ricks, author and essayist, Elif Batuman, writer and broadcaster, Aminatta Forna, novelist Yiyun Li, and author and academic, Tim Parks. The winner of the prize will be announced in London on 22nd May 2013. 

The ten finalists are 
U.R. Ananthamurthy (India),
Aharon Appelfeld (Israel),
Lydia Davis (USA),
Intizar Husain (Pakistan),
Yan Lianke (China),
Marie NDiaye (France),
Josip Novakovich (Canada),
Marilynne Robinson (USA),
Vladimir Sorokin (Russia) and
Peter Stamm (Switzerland). 

The Man Booker International Prize is awarded every two years to a living author who has published a substantial body of work either written or translated in English. Announcing the list, Chair of the judging panel, Christopher Ricks commented “Some of these men and women are in their eighties, the youngest in their forties and fifties. They write in ways that are astonishingly different.” 

 For this year’s prize, a total of 150 bodies of work were considered, from which the ten finalists were chosen. The Kannada language is represented this year with the inclusion of Indian writer, U.R. Ananthamurthy.